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and you have the intelligence committee that is analyzed and they give it to the administration or us. what happened in that situation is there are some who have said that by taking the word al qaeda out and putting extremist that changed the content. i don't see it that way. i think extremist covers a lot of different individuals and not only terrorist, but people involved in the militias in libya and other area, but that has been a debate today. has general petraeus' position changed from benghazi to now? has she hifted? because he seems to convey the impression that he knew from the start that it was a terror group or this one namedance ar al sharia and there were other reports flying around that it may be connected to the video protest. >> first let me say his testimony today cleared up a lot of issues on both sides of the aisle. i think it was important that the director of the cia it was important that he testify. i think it was important for our country and the intelligence community and to bring closure to the issues involving him. one of the issues that a lot of people were p
blitzer, who is live for us in jerusalem tonight, and anderson cooper and ben wedeman, both in gaza city. wolf, let me start with you if i may. a very tense day with claim and counterclaim coming almost on an hourly basis. there was going to be a cease-fire, then no cease-fire. both sides trading sort of insults and then offering fig leaves. what do you make of it all? as we talk now in the middle of a night there, what do you make of where we really are with this? >> well, throughout most of the day, i thought they were very close to reaching a cease-fire agreement. all the signs looked rather positive. then all of a sudden, on this day, it was getting increasingly more tense in the southern part of israel and what we've been seeing in gaza, very, very bloody as well. you wouldn't know that they are apparently rather close to some sort of a deal, that the egyptian government, the new president, mohammed morsi, seemed to be brokering. they may still get some sort of cease-fire agreement. it looks very tenuous to me right now but you know, sometimes just before, having covered cease-fires
news is that we now have an official mascot of the ridiculous. oh. that does it for us and we'll see you one hour from now on israel and gaza city. "pierce morgan tonight" starts now. >>> good evening tonight. rising fears of of a ground war in the middle east. today gaza was bombarded by israeli missiles and rockets rained down today in tel aviv and jerusalem. israeli troops are amassing and with a possibility of a ground invation. first, inside the capital where general petraeus testifies about gen gassy, the ex-cia chief brought down by an affair showed it was a terrorist attack. he also said it was intentionally withheld with his affairs of tipping off the terrorist group. the cia's talking points in response to the missile initially calling it a terrorist attack that was edited out of the final version. the change was not made for political reasons. bear with me now as congressman, ranking member of intelligence. welcome to you. >> good to be here, pierce. >> we now know the white house, the statement coming from tommy. >> the talking points about the intelligence, and the white
's difficult for all parties, but it's not over and the best choice for all of us is to stop shooting. >> you'll hear more from that exclusive interview in a moment. we begin with cnn's arwa damon live in gaza city. arwa, i had a fascinating conversation with president peres earlier. he's still saying that it could go either way but what is your sense on the ground about the likely prospects of a cease-fire and how long will the israelis give it before committing to a possible ground offensive? >> reporter: the likelihood of a cease-fire seems to be increasingly elusive the longer this does drag on, and all through the night, we have been hearing the sound of air strikes, some of them have actually shook the building that we're standing in. we have also been seeing rockets continuously being fired from gaza city, from the center of the city towards israel. not a lot of optimism on the ground here amongst residents of the city who have been through this on so many occasions in the past, that there will be any sort of cease-fire that is going to take effect in the near future, not to mention on
negotiated with egypt and with the support of the united states, and it promises us what this whole campaign was about. it promises the people of southern israel peace and quiet. it promises them that they no longer have to live in constant fear of an incoming rocket launched from the gaza strip. it promises them for the first time in a very long time the possibility to live a normal life. and from our point of view, if these promises are fulfilled, that's a good thing. >> i understand that also it promises the people of gaza, perhaps, a better future. we're hearing via "the new york times" as i speak to you that the terms also state the underlying grievances of gaza, the movement that impedes through gaza, will be started 24 hours after the cease-fire is in effect. now, that is clearly a big move by israel. >> i think it's important to remember the following. there's cause and there's effect. when we pulled out of gaza in 2005, when we took down our settlements and pulled back to the international frontier, there were no restrictions in place whatsoever. our restrictions were in place when
>>> that's it for us. we'll be back one hour from now with all the latest from israel and gaza with the fighting there. "piers morgan tonight" starts now. >>> good evening. we start with breaking news tonight. you're looking live at israel, close to the gaza border, where fears of a ground water between israel and hamas are growing. air strikes have already killed 19 palestinians and three israelis as rockets and shells rain down on both sides. it's an extraordinarily dangerous situation. we'll go live to the region in a few moments. >>> meanwhile, a storm is brewing on capitol hill over benghazi. in closed door sessions, lawmakers saw a disturbing video from the night of the deadly attack. sources tell cnn it shows ambassador christopher stevens being dragged out of the compound. republicans are still blasting the white house response to that attack. i'll talk to senator john mccain in a minute. >>> in new york city, president obama meets with storm survivors where more than 25,000 households are still without power. more than two weeks after super storm sandy hit. >>> we begi
countries see opportunity in the united states of america. thanks for joining us. >>> good evening. breaking news tonight. you're looking live at a tense and fearful gaza city but what you can't see, thousands of israeli troops with tanks and armored vehicles poised on gaza's borders ready to invade if israel believes there's no chance for a cease-fire in its conflict with hamas. the world is watching and waiting. this was the scene earlier today. tonight, i talked to both sides of the conflict, listen to what israel's president, shimon peres, tells me about the looming threat of all-out war. you do believe, mr. president, that a ground war may be inevitable? >> well, i hope that we achieve cease-fire. the negotiations are still being continued. it's difficult for all parties, but it's not over and the best choice for all of us is to stop shooting. >> you'll hear more from that exclusive interview in a moment. we begin with cnn's arwa damon live in gaza city. arwa, i had a fascinating conversation with president peres earlier. he's still saying that it could go either way but what
think he's one of the finest leaders that this nation's ever produced. many of us feel terrible about all of the events that have transpired. but of course we're all accountable. every one of us. and unfortunately, in this town, usually the mantra is everybody's responsible so nobody's responsible. >> let's turn to events in israel and gaza. clearly escalating very dangerously again in the last 24 hours. what is your take on this and what do you think the american reaction should be, if anything? >> well, i think the whole area is unraveling. i think there's a lack of american leadership. i don't attribute that directly to this latest flareup. the thing that's changed now as opposed to previous confrontations between israel and hamas is that we don't know what role the egyptians are going to play here. the egyptians have been equivocal, as you know, on this whole issue of gaza and the sinai and all those things so it will be very interesting to see how the egyptians come down on this. i don't think there's any doubt this is a terrible escalation. thank god they've got iron dome but ob
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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